Frederick W. Spiegel, John D. Shadwick, Lora A. Lindley,'s A Beginner’s Guide to Identifying The Protostelids PDF

By Frederick W. Spiegel, John D. Shadwick, Lora A. Lindley, Matthew W. Brown

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By Frederick W. Spiegel, John D. Shadwick, Lora A. Lindley, Matthew W. Brown

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Extra info for A Beginner’s Guide to Identifying The Protostelids

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No other protostelid has such long, thin, and smoothly flexuous stalks. Similar species: Sporocarps of P. fragile with spherical sporangia are similar; however, their flexuous stalks are bent at sharp angles. Spores multiple, stalks long A B Protosporangium conicum Bennett This is the second most common species of the genus, though it is much more likely to be encountered in arid habitats than anywhere else. Stalk: long, thin, somewhat flexuous, waving readily in air currents. Spores: Always four per sporocarp, with the one that attaches to the stalk obconic; the other three spherical, arranged at distal end of obconic spore.

Recurvatum. However, there is an uncommon undescribed species most often encountered on bark which is superficially resembles it. The undescribed species, for which no trophic state has yet been observed, is the same size and recurved, but it has a single, highly sculptured spore and the stalk is longitudinally ridged and tapers from base to tip. The undescribed species often appears to be yellow to gold under a dissecting microscope. Spores multiple, stalks short SH SH A B C Echinosteliopsis oligospora Reinhardt & Olive This common species is treated as short stalked because it is usually first observed on PIP with a hydrated sheath that makes the diameter of the sporangium greater than the length of the stalk.

A and B). Stalk: very short, wide, with a cup-like apophysis that occupies one third to more than one half the total length of the stalk. Spore: spherical, roughened in appearance by the presence of numerous spines and warts on the spore wall (Fig. C). This spore wall sculpturing often makes the spores appear to be less refractile than those of other protostelids. Some spores may contain two cells in some isolates. Such spores look ellipsoid from above and from the side. Prespore Cell (PSP): not shown, circular in outline.

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A Beginner’s Guide to Identifying The Protostelids by Frederick W. Spiegel, John D. Shadwick, Lora A. Lindley, Matthew W. Brown


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